OPERATION CHRISTMAS CHILD 2012

Welcome to Cents To Save! Follow along as we pay down our debt, become mortgage free, and enjoy life. You can read more about this site here and subscribe to get all the latest updates sent to you by email or RSS feed here. Thanks for visiting!

Thrift Store Shopping Tips

Thrift Store shopping is a way of life for me and my family. I still will go to full price discount stores as well, but I make it a habit to include thrift stores in my weekly routine. Near my work there are several thrift stores. There is the Goodwill which changes or adds to its daily inventory on a regular basis. This time of year is a great time to increase your visits to the Goodwill or Salvation Army because they will be working in the tax write off donations from the end of the year.

Also, there is an independent Thrift store that I visit regularly. At this store, the owner will take items on consignment and work the items into the store. Now… I use consignment loosely. If you choose to use her store, you sign a contract that basically stipulates that she will decide if the items you submit are of value and if so she will tag the item with your assigned number and place it into the rest of her items. When the item sells, she will credit your account accordingly. She of course will get a commission on the items as well. If she decides that the item submitted is not something she can sell, she will donate it to a local shelter. This also is the case when the items have been in her store for an extended amount of time. Basically, when you sign up with her, you really do not plan on getting anything back. I turn in things to her about once a year. Around Christmas, I will go and collect my profits which usually add up to about 70.00 dollars on the average.
There is also a nonprofit thrift store for a local charity not too far away as well. I have limited success here, but I still visit at least once a week.

1. Visit Local Thrift Stores on a Regular Basis
Visit At least once a week if not more. Get a feel for the items they carry, and get to know the individuals that work there. If you have a good relationship with them, you can on occasion ask if they will give you a better price for an item that you are wanting to purchase. Or, you can ask them to keep an eye out for an item that you are looking for.

2. Carry Cash.
The bigger thrift stores such as Goodwill and Salvation Army will accept debit, but for the most part, dealing with cash purchases is the best way to go. The smaller stores or “mom and pop” stores appreciate cash AND by using cash you will be better able to budget your money. Debit cards seem to provide a reason to spend more…. A freedom that will definitely get you into money trouble. Cash is the way to go!

3. Leave Kids (or husband) at Home.
If you are serious about watching where your money is going, definitely shop alone. Kids will definitely increase your impulse buying and husbands will most likely do the same. I know I have a hard enough time controlling my personal impulse binges,(carrying cash does help) and having to always say no to your kids and or your husband can get old really quick. If you do have to, or you want to bring your kids or husband, give them the amount of cash that you are willing to let them spend. Once they have gone through the money then they are done. This tactic is easier to enforce with your kids than with your husband. J

4. Be Familiar with Brand Names.

Being familiar with brand names can save you a lot of time and trouble in the long run. Buying an item that is a “really great deal” but an unfamiliar manufacture can cause your pocketbook pain later on. If your kids like Gap, Levi, etc., that is what you need to be on the lookout for. If you bring home an item that is a Levi wanna be, your kids (this may apply to teens and pre teens) may refuse to wear it. Money is lost. The same goes for you. Buy items of quality. Don’t buy it because it’s a good deal. A $1.99 spent on a shirt that you may wear is a $1.99 wasted. Only buy what you or your family will definitely wear or use.

5. Gift Shopping.

You can successfully shop for Christmas and or Birthday gifts at the Thrift Store.
Case in point, I found a set of 20 “Coca-Cola” Stoneware plates for 15.00 dollars. The plates were in almost perfect shape, with several looking like they had never been used at all. I personally do not get a big thrill out of Coca-Cola Collectibles but my daughter’s in-laws are HUGE collectors of anything Coca-Cola! I called my daughter to see if she would be interested in the plates for her father in law. I also sent her a picture of them on my phone and she was so excited as her father in law did not yet have anything like these plates in his collection. I purchased the plates for 15.00 dollars and my daughter paid me for them later on that week. She had a great present that her father in law was thrilled to receive. In fact, he served Christmas dinner on them.
This is just one example of “gift shopping” at a Thrift store. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure!!

What other tips do you have to share?

4 comments:

Paula said...

You are very right about one mans trash is anothers treasure. I think that is why people garage sale so much. I am not a huge thrift shop person but I can tell you I donate a huge amount of clothing each year to our local st vincent de paul society. My church has a truck come once a month to fill up...the people (not me) that go to my church are rich, I mean rich and they give away things that are worn once or never worn at all. So shop away for a good deal.

Jackie said...

I loved your thrift store post. I grew up shopping almost exclusively at the thrift store. When I moved out and was young and stupid, I swore off the thrift store. Well common sense has returned to me and I LOVE my local thrift store. Your comment about knowing your labels is priceless. I wore designer clothing all through my school years. All of my clothing was bought at the thrift store. Great post!

Lisa said...

Thanks for your kind words Jackie!

Jackie said...

I loved your thrift store post. I grew up shopping almost exclusively at the thrift store. When I moved out and was young and stupid, I swore off the thrift store. Well common sense has returned to me and I LOVE my local thrift store. Your comment about knowing your labels is priceless. I wore designer clothing all through my school years. All of my clothing was bought at the thrift store. Great post!

ShareThis